The Impact of Being a Geriatric Care Giver

Updated: May 6, 2019


If you think you are saving by caring for your loved one…think again. Below are some statistics that show the huge impacts to the individual care giver, not just in health but financially as well. There is also stress put on the family that can divide even the strongest of families. In turn, most people don’t want to have to be taken care of by a loved one. Feelings of guilt and regret, regardless of fault, can make one feel like a burden.


Navigating the system is also becoming increasingly difficult. An Advocate can help save your family from personal and financial ruin and reduce the stress that this process creates, providing you the time to spend with your loved ones, worry free…

As professionally certified guardians, we care for personal and financial matters, protecting individual rights and safety. We ensure that the life/care plan we build is consistent with the individual’s strengths, needs and choices.


Six reasons why being the care giver is not always the best option

  1. 23% of family caregivers caring for loved ones for 5 years or more report their health is fair or poor. Caregiving in the United States; National Alliance for Caregiving in collaboration with AARP; November 2009

  2. Stress of family caregiving for persons with dementia has been shown to impact a person’s immune system for up to three years after their caregiving ends thus increasing their chances of developing a chronic illness themselves. Drs. Janice-Kiecolt Glaser and Ronald Glaser, “Chronic stress and age-related increases in the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 30, 2003.

  3. Nearly three quarters (72%) of family caregivers report not going to the doctor as often as they should and 55% say they skip doctor appointments for themselves. 63% of caregivers report having poor eating habits than non-caregivers and 58% indicate worse exercise habits than before caregiving responsibilities. Evercare Study of Caregivers in Decline: A Close-Up Look at Health Risks of Caring for a Loved One. National Alliance for Caregiving and Evercare. 2006.

  4. American businesses can lose as much as $34 billion each year due to employees’ need to care for loved ones 50 years of age and older. MetLife Caregiving Cost Study: Productivity Losses to U.S. MetLife Mature Market Institute and National Alliance for Caregiving Business. July 2006

  5. Women who are family caregivers are 2.5 times more likely than non-caregivers to live in poverty and five times more likely to receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Study conducted by researchers at Rice University and data compiled from the Health and Retirement Study funded by the National Institute of Aging and conducted by the University of Michigan, 1992-2004

  6. Caregiving families (families in which one member has a disability) have median incomes that are more than 15% lower than non-caregiving families. In every state and DC the poverty rate is higher among families with members with a disability than among families without. Disability and American Families: 2000, Census 2000 Special Reports, July 2005.

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