Dementia and Guardianship

Updated: May 6, 2019


1 in 3 seniors die with Alzheimer’s or some form of dementia. Of the 5.4 million Americans with Alzheimer’s, an estimated 5.2 million people are age 65 and older, and approximately 200,000 individuals are under age 65 (younger-onset Alzheimer’s). One in nine people age 65 and older has Alzheimer’s disease. By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds.


Guardianship of adults suffering from Dementia can become necessary when the adult becomes incapable of making decisions for themselves and they don’t have a Power of Attorney in place. See What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney?


Caring for a loved one with dementia comes with a unique set of challenges, including issues such as harm to self. For example, an individual might set a fire while cooking or become a wander risk or begin to think someone is going to harm them or is breaking into their home. See Practical Advice on Caring for a Parent with Dementia


Typically, as the disease progresses, it becomes more emotionally and physically draining for the caregiver who often reaches a breaking point. When focusing on the negative, it can become exhausting and overwhelming. See Recognizing the Signs of Caregiver Burnout


It’s important to find supportive services such as those offered by Living Life with Dignity before this point is reached. The volatility of the disease can make situations dangerous and upsetting. Depending on the progression or type of dementia, needs can change rapidly. For many, it is a full time commitment. See Dementia and Caregiving Challenges and What is a Health Directive for Dementia?


Case Study

Living Life with Dignity was appointed Guardian of and Advocate for an 83-year-old female suffering from Dementia.


Background

She was a retired nurse living alone, estranged from her adopted son and raising her deceased daughter’s son. The female, having lived in her current home for 60 years, had her neighbors all rally to help. Her phonecalls to the neighbors started to become erratic and she became acutely paranoid that someone was trying to break into her home. She refused having a caregiver and expressed her desire to fire her attorney and Power of Attorney. Upon contacting a new attorney, it became obvious to the attorney that the client needed intervention and guardianship.


Services

Living Life with Dignity was called in and we provided the following services for the client:

  • Obtained appropriate placement

  • Assisted with guardianship process of the Estate

  • Appointed as Guardian of the Person

  • Advocate with facility for her care

  • Advocate at hospital for her treatment

  • Assisted with Medicare B re-enrollment

  • Assisted with funeral arrangements


Also see: This Job Sucks! Choosing the right Power of Attorney is imperative


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